5 Hints for Telling a Good Story

how to read to childrenFancy finding a way of having more fun reading stories to your kids? I read stories to my kids regularly, at least one a night and often more than that but apparently a lot of parents don’t do this (if Disney’s survey statistics are to believed I’m actually in the minority). I wrote about this issue in a blog post a few months ago so if you pop over to that you’ll see all the details and statistics, not to mention several arguments explaining the benefits of reading to your children (here’s the link). Given that I’ve already said my piece about the positive aspects of reading I thought today’s post could work as a guide to helping you and your kids enjoy the time you spend reading with them. You probably already do most of what follows but if you are unfamiliar with reading to you kids then hopefully this list can go some way to making it a much more enjoyable experience:

1) First off, think about the books you’re going to be reading. You shouldn’t read stories to your children that you yourself find boring or tedious. In fact your boredom will effect the way you read, leading to a boring and tedious delivery that your kids will tire of quickly. In short a book you don’t like will become a book none of you likes. Instead pick something you can get excited about, the excitement in your voice will catch attention and make the story instantly more engaging.

2) Drop any fear you have of being seen as ‘silly’, you’re a parent so that ship has already sailed; you have years ahead of you filled with your kids seeing you as out-of-touch, embarrassing or ridiculous, so give up any notion that you can still be ‘cool’ (at least in their eyes) and just get on with it. What you can be is fun, engaging and entertaining. Some of this leads on from 1, and it’s extremely important. You’ll need to give up to silliness if you want reading to become a shared (and enjoyable) activity. This saves it from becoming a chore which sees you spending your whole time just wrestling to get your kids to sit and listen.

3) Learn how to change your voice, even if only a little. From my experience most stories seem to have at most about 4 or 5 main speaking characters (though there are obviously a few exceptions). Keeping this in mind try and figure out some way of making four or five voices which are distinct from each other and your normal speaking voice (since you’ll be narrating in that). If you’re not good at imitating accents don’t do accents, it’ll just distract you, just change the tone and find different ways of talking by graduating between your ‘telephone voice’ and your more relaxed everyday accent.

4) Move your body and make eye contact with your kids. It’s not too hard to remember a few words in a row that you’ve just read. I find the simplest thing is to focus on dialogue; authors go to great lengths to keep dialogue short and snappy so it’s a great place to start breaking your gaze away from the book. You can then use expression and gestures to emphasise the character you’re playing. This way even if you find it hard to alter your voice you can have a second shot at distinguishing between characters through body language.

5) Read often and develop some favourites. If your child loves a particular book go with it and instead of getting bored with the repetition use it test your memorisation skills. This is actually a simple way of developing the skills described in 3) and 4) as you’ll come to know the characters better and find subtle ways of tweeking the way you play them. Repetition will also build your confidence, making it easier for you to adapt to new stories that come along.

That’s about it, it might never get you on Jackanory (or is that cbeebies bedtime stories now?) but it should make story time a lot more fun. This list is far from exhaustive so I’d love to hear any hints or tips you have for making story time more fun. Thanks again for popping over to my blog, Cheers, John

Oh and one last thing, try to encourage your child(ren) to tell a story along with the pictures too, even if they’re not readers yet, they’ll start to see how much fun it could be to read for themselves. Just as the repetition helps you, so too will your child(ren) pick up the story and eventually make it their own. Logan went through a phase where he could recite The Graffalo word for word (he couldn’t read at that stage, he rust remembered the story). He eventually started telling the story without the pictures in the book to help him. I’m not sure if there are any studies to support this but certainly from personal experience, reading to your children has a massive impact on their ability to retain text and recognise variation in tone at a very young age. Both pretty handy skills.

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4 comments on “5 Hints for Telling a Good Story

  1. richardsts says:

    Great post, John! I will definitely try those things next time I read a book to somebody 🙂
    Cheers!

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  2. […] to my previous post ‘5 hints for telling a good story‘ some of this is specific to reading but the explanations of how to change your voice and […]

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  3. […] light of my previous posts ‘How to play‘ and ‘5 Hints for Telling a Good Story‘ I thought I might go through some of my favourite character voices for you to try out at […]

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